English Speaking Saints And Martyrs

English Saints and Martyrs

Saturday, May 29, 2010

ENGLISH SAINTS AND MARTYRS MAY30-JUNE 05

May 30
Bl. William Filby
Feastday: May 30
1582 A.D.
Martyr of England. Born in Oxfordshire, he studied at Oxford. After graduation, William was converted to Catholicism and went to Reims, France, where he received ordination as a priest in 1581. He returned to England immediately and was arrested with St. Edmund Campion. William was executed at Tyburn with three companions on May 30. He was beatified in 1886.

Bl. Thomas Cottam
Feastday: May 30
1582 A.D.
English martyr. Born at Dilworth, Lancashire, England, in 1549, he was raised as a Protestant and studied at Oxford University before undergoing a conversion to Catholicism. Leaving England to prepare for ordination at Douai and Rome, he was ordained and joined the Jesuits. going home in 1580. Arrested at his landing at Dover, he was taken to the Tower of London and eventually hanged, drawn, and quartered with three companions.

St. Walstan
Feastday: May 30
1016 A.D.
Penitent and model of charity. Born at Bawburgh, near Norwich, England, he was renowned for his charity and intense personal goodness, spending his life in prayer. Wealthy, he gave away his goods and worked as a farmhand at Taverham and Costessey. Walstan became a popular saint in the area of Norwich and became the hero of various legends. His shrine at Bawburgh was much visited until the English Reformation of the sixteenth century when it was destroyed.

Bl. Lawrence Richardson
Feastday: May 30
1582
Martyr of England. He was born in Great Crosby, Lancashire, England, and was educated at Oxford. Converting to the faith, Lawrence went to Douai, France, and was ordained in 1577. He returned to Lancashire and worked there until his martyrdom at Tyburn. He was beatified in 1886.

St. Luke Kirby
Feastday: May 30
1582 A.D.
One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. Probably educated at Cambridge, England, he converted and studied in Rome and in Douai, France. In 1580, he returned to England, only to be arrested two years later. Luke was imprisoned in the Tower of London and subjected to the infamous device “Scavenger’s Daughter.” a hideous form of torture. He was then martyred at Tyburn.

Bl. Richard Newport
Feastday: May 30
1612 A.D.
English martyr, also called Richard Smith. Born at Harringworth, Nothamptonshire, England, he studied in Rome and was ordained in 1597. Returning to England, he worked in London for a number of years before being arrested and banished twice, but he returned each time. His third arrest was with Blessed William Scott. Both were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tybum for being Catholic priests.

Bl. Maurus Scott
Feastday: May 30
1612 A.D.
Benedictine martyr of England. Bom William Scott in Chigwell, Essex, England, he studied law at Cambridge, where he became a Catholic. Maurus was converted by Blessed John Roberts, the Benedictine, and was sent to Sahagun, in Spain, to St. Facundus Benedictine Abbey He was ordained there, taking the name Maurus. When he returned to England he was arrested, imprisoned for a year, and then banished. He returned again and again, being exiled each time. Finally, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on May 30 with Blessed Richard Newport. They were beatified in 1929.

St. Madelgisilus
Feastday: May 30
Irish monk and companion of St. Fursey. Also known as Mauguille, Maguil, or Mauguil, he accompanied St. Fursey from Ireland to England and then to France. He became a monk at Saint-Riquier when St. Fursey died. He then left the monastery to avoid the adulation of his fellow monks and became a hermit at Monstrelet with St. Pulgan.

May 31

St. Vitalis
Feastday: May 31
1370 A.D.
Benedictine hermit. Originally a monk of Monte Subasio, near Assisi, Italy, he gave up the monastic life to become a hermit near Assisi. He spent two years in a hermitage.

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June 1

St. Wistan, 850 A.D. Wistan (d.c. 850), Martyr of England. A grandson of the king of Mercia, he was supposedly murdered by Bertulph, king of Mercia and his godfather, for opposing the ruler's planned marriage to Wistan's mother. Originally buried at Repton, his remains were translated to Evesham Cathedral

St. Tegla. Patron saint of a church and well in Ciwyd, Wales.

St. Ronan. A Celtic bishop who promoted the faith in his native Cornwall, England, and in Brittany, France. Ronan is also associated with St. Rumon in some accounts.

Bl. John Storey,
1571 A.D.
Martyr of England. A Doctor of Law, John studied at Oxford, was president of Broadgate Hall and a professor of law, and was an active Catholic in the reign of Queen Mary Tudor. Married about 1547, he entered Parliament and was vocal in his opposition to various anti-Catholic laws then being proposed by the governments of King Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth I. Arrested and imprisoned, he managed to escape but was captured by Elizabeth’s agents in Antwerp, returned for a trial, and executed at Tyburn.

St. Candida. The village Whitchurch Canonicorum in Dorset, mentioned in the will of King Alfred as Hwitn Cyrcian, presumably takes its name from St. Wite, and its church is dedicated in her honor (the Latin form "Candida" is not recorded before the sixteenth century). In the north transept of the church is her shrine.

June 2

St. Adalgis, 686 A.D. A missionary and monastic founder, born in Ireland. As part of the heroic undertakings of the early Irish monks, Adalgis, who was a disciple of St. Fursey, sailed from his home to France. He did missionary work in Arras and Laon and founded a monastery in Picardy.

St. Bodfan, 7th century. Patron saint of Ahern, in Gwynredd, Wales. He saw the formation of Beaumaris Bay in a natural inundation and became a religious.

June 3

St. Kevin. Known in Ireland as Coemgen as well as Kevin, according to tradition he was born at the Fort of the White Fountain in Leinster, Ireland, of royal descent. He was baptized by St. Cronan and educated by St. Petroc. He was ordained, and became a hermit at the Valley of the Two Lakes in Glendalough. After seven years there, he was persuaded to give up his solitary life. He went to Disert-Coemgen, where he founded a monastery for the disciples he attracted, and later moved to Glendalough. He made a pilgrimage to Rome, bringing back many relics for his permanent foundation at Glendalough. He was a friend of St. Kieran of Clonmacnois, and was entrusted with the raising of the son of King Colman of Ui Faelain, by the king. Many extravagant miracles were attributed to Kevin, and he was reputed to be 120 years old at his death.

St. Cronan, 617 A.D. A disciple of St. Kevin called “the Tanner.”
St. Glushallaich, 7th century. Irish hermit who was a disciple of St. Kevin. Glunshallaich was buried in St. Kevin’s graveyard in Glenadalough, Ireland.

June 4

St. Petroc. Petroc was born in Wales, possibly the son of a Welsh king. He became a monk and with some of his friends, went to Ireland to study. They immigrated to Cornwall in England and settled at Lanwethinoc (Padstow). After thirty years there, he made a pilgrimage to Rome and Jerusalem, at which time he is also reputed to have reached the Indian Ocean where he lived for some time as a hermit on an island. He then returned to Cornwall, built a chapel at Little Petherick near Padstow, established a community of his followers, and then became a hermit at Bodmir Moor, where he again attracted followers and was known for his miracles. He died between Nanceventon and Lanwethinoc while visiting some of his disciples there.

St. Breaca, 5th or 6th century. Disciple of St. Brigid, also called Breque, Branca, and Branka. She went from Ireland to Cornwall, England, about 460. There Breaca and her companions settled on the bank of the Hoyle River.

St. Buriana, 6th century. Irish hermitess of Cornwall, known for penitential practices and holiness. She is venerated at Buryan, opposite the Isles of Scilly.

St. Walter, 1150 A.D. Benedictine abbot. Born in England, he served as a monk and then became the abbot of Fontenelle, France, the famed Benedictine spiritual center. Pope Innocent II (r. 1130-1143) noted his zeal and holiness.

St. Cornelius, 1176 A.D. Archbishop of Armagh, Ireland, also called Cornelius Mac Conchailleadh or McConchailleach. An Irishman, he joined the Augustinians at Armagh in 1140 and was made abbot in 1151. In 1174, he was made bishop. Cornelius died in Canbery, Savoy, France, while returning from a pilgrimage to Rome.

St. Croidan, 6th century. A disciple of St. Petroc with St. Medan and Degan.

June 5

St. Tudno, 6th century. Welsh saint after whom Llandudno in Gwynedd, Wales, is named. He figures in various Welsh Christian legends.

St. Eoban, 754 A.D. Benedictine monk and martyr of Irish descent, a companion of Sts. Willibrord and Boniface. Eoban was martyred with Boniface at Dokkum, Holland.

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