English Speaking Saints And Martyrs

English Saints and Martyrs

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Bl. William Ireland - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

Bl. William Ireland - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



Bl. William Ireland, Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and English Martyr. He was executed at Tyburn for supposed complicity in the Popish Plot. Feastday Jan 24

Bl. William Ireland - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

Bl. William Ireland - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



Bl. William Ireland, Roman Catholic Jesuit Priest and English Martyr. He was executed at Tyburn for supposed complicity in the Popish Plot. Feastday Jan 24

Bl. John Grove - Saints

Bl. John Grove - Saints



Bl. John Grove, Roman Catholic layman and English Martyr, He was executed at Tyburn for supposed complicity in the Popish Plot. Feastday Jan24

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Bl. William Patenson - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

Bl. William Patenson - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



Bl. William Patenson, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr. Born at Durham, he departed his homeland and studied at Reims before receiving ordination there in 1587. The following year he sailed home and worked to promote the Catholic cause in the dangerous atmosphere of Elizabethan England. Arrested in 1591, he was tried and condemned for being a priest and was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. During his imprisonment, he converted six other prisoners to the Catholic faith. Feastday Jan.22

To Be A Priest


The One Rose Invitation - Imagine Sisters


The Imagine Sisters Movement


Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Bl. Edward Stransham - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

Bl. Edward Stransham - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



Bl. Edward Stransham, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr. Hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on January 21, 1642. Feastday January 21

St. Alban Bartholomew Roe - Thomas Reynolds-Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

St. Alban Bartholomew Roe - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



St. Alban Bartholomew Roe, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr. For seventeen years he remained in prison and was then tried and condemned. Alban was sentenced with Thomas Reynolds, another English martyr. They were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on January 21, 1642. Feastday Jan 21

English Speaking Roman Catholic Saints and Martys Featday Jan 21

St. Alban Bartholomew Roe, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr. For seventeen years he remained in prison and was then tried and condemned. Alban was sentenced with Thomas Reynolds, another English martyr. They were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on January 21, 1642.

Friday, June 06, 2014

Bl. Robert Salt - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

Bl. Robert Salt - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



Bl. Robert Salt, Roman Catholic Carthusian Brother and English Martyr, With six other Carthusians he was starved to death in prison. Feastday June 6

BL. John Davy - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

BL. John Davy - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



BL. John Davy, Roman Catholic Carthusian Brother and English Martyr, starved to death in Newgate Prison with six Carthusian companions. Feastday June 6

Bl. Walter Pierson - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

Bl. Walter Pierson - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



Bl. Walter Pierson, Roman Catholic Carthusian Brother and English Martyr, With six other Carthusians he was starved to death in prison.  Feastday June 6

Sunday, June 01, 2014

Bl. John Storey - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online

Bl. John Storey - Saints & Angels - Catholic Online



Bl. John Storey, Roman Catholic Priest and English Martyr. A Doctor of Law, John studied at Oxford, was president of Broadgate Hall and a professor of law, and was an active Catholic in the reign of Queen Mary Tudor. Married about 1547, he entered Parliament and was vocal in his opposition to various anti-Catholic laws then being proposed by the governments of King Edward VI and Queen Elizabeth I . Arrested and imprisoned, he managed to escape but was captured by Elizabeth’s agents in Antwerp, returned for a trial, and executed at Tyburn. Feastday June 1

Saturday, May 31, 2014

Saint Anne Line, English Martyr, five minute film clip, Catholic Saint, ...


The Catholic Lincolnshire Martyrs


Plague priests, St John Southworth, Tyburn gallows, Mary's Dowry Produc...


Saturday, October 02, 2010

ENGLISH SAINTS AND MARTYRS OCT 03-OCT.09

October 3

Sts. Ewald and Ewald, 695 A.D. Martyred Northumbrian brothers, one called “the Fair” and one called “the Dark,” companions of St. Willibrord. From Northumbria, they were educated in Ireland. These priests of the Benedictine Order went with Willibrord to Frisia, Netherlands. They were martyred together at Aplerbeke, near Dortmund, Germany, by local pagans.

October 5

Bl. William Hartley, 1588 A.D. Martyr of England. Born at WiIne, Derbyshire, he studied at Oxford and was an Anglican minister before his conversion to Catholicism. Going to Reims, France, he received ordination in 1580 and went back to the English mission to aid St. Edmund Campion. He was arrested in 1582 and deported from England. He returned and was captured again at Holborn. William was hanged at Shoreditch and beatified in 1929.

Bl. Robert Sutton, 1588 A.D. English martyr. Born at Kegwell, Leicestershire, he became an Anglican priest, studying at Oxford. In 1575, he converted and went to Douai, France. He returned to England and was arrested in London and hanged at Clerkenwell.

October 6

St. Ceollach, 7th century. Irish bishop of the Mercians or Middle Angles of England. He retired to lona, Scotland, but died in Ireland.

St. Cumine, 669 A.D. Irish abbot called “the White.” The abbot of Iona, Scotland, he wrote a biography of St. Columba.


October 7

St. Canog, 492 A.D. Martyr and eldest son of the local king of Brecknock in Wales. He was slain by barbarians at Merthyr-Cynog. In Brittany, France, he is called St Cenneur. Several churches in Wales honor him.

St. Dubtach, 513 A.D. The Archbishop of Armagh, Ireland, from 497 until his death.

St. Helanus, 6th century. Irish hermit who went to France with six brothers and three sisters. They settled in Reims, where Helanus became a priest.

St. Osyth, 700 A.D. Martyred nun, also called Osith and Sytha. Known mainly through legends, she was supposedly the daughter of a chieftain of the Mercians in England and Wilburga, daughter of the powerful pagan king Penda of Mercia. Raised in a convent, Osyth desired to become a nun but was married against her will to King Sighere of Essex, by whom she had a son. Eventually, she won his permission to enter a convent, and she established a monastery on land at Chich, Essex, donated by Sighere, where she served as an abbess. She was reputedly slain by Danish raiders and is thus depicted in art as carrying her own head. There are historical difficulties associated with her existence, especially as no mention is made of her by Bede in his Ecclesiastical History.

October 8

St. Keyne. Keyna or Cain was one of the twenty-four children of King Brychan of Brecknock, Wales. She refused several suitors' offers of marriage and became a hermitess on the banks of the Severn River in Somersetshire, England. After living there for several years, during which she traveled widely, she was persuaded by her nephew, St. Cadoc, to return to Wales, though exactly where she spent her last days is not known. During her travels, she founded numerous churches in South Wales, Cornwall, and perhaps Somerset.

St. Ywi, 690 A.D. Benedictine monk and hermit at Lindisfarne Abbey, England. He was ordained a deacon by St. Cuthbert. When Ywi died as a hermit, his relics were enshrined at Wilton, near Salisbury.

St. Triduna, 4th century. A virgin who, according to tradition, assisted St. Regulus in his mission to Scotland during the fourth century. She is also listed as Trallen and Tredwall. Her shrine at Restalrig was long venerated until its destruction in 1560 during the Scottish Reformation.

ENGLISH SAINTS AND MARTYRS SEPT. 26-OCT 02

September 26

St. Colman of Elo, 612 A.D. Abbot and bishop, also called Colman Lann Elo. He was born circa 555 at Glenelly, Tyrone, Ireland, the nephew of St. Columba, In 590 A.D.; he built a monastery at Offaly. He also founded Muckamore Abbey and became bishop of Connor. Colman was the author of the Alphabet of Devotion. He died at Lynally on December 26.

St. Meugant, 6th century. Hermit of Britain. Also called Maughan, Mawghan, and Morgan, he was a disciple of St. lIltyd and reportedly died on the island of Bardsey. He is the titular patron of churches in Wales and Cornwall.

September 27

St. Barrog, 7th century. Disciple of St. Cadoc, in Wales, also called Barroq and Barnoc. He was a hermit who lived on Barry Island, off the coast of Glamorgen.

September 28

St. Annemund, 658 A.D. Bishop and friend of St. Wilfrid of York, called Delphinus by Bede and Chamond or Annemundus. The son of a prefect in Lyons, Gaul, Annemund was raised in the count of King Dagobert I. When Clovis II succeeded to the throne, Annemund served as his councilor. Named the bishop of Lyons, Annemund befriended St. Wufrid of York. When Clovis died, Annemund was slain in the political upheaval of his time. He died on September 28, 658.

St. Tetta, 772 A.D. Benedictine abbess. She governed the convent of Wimborne in Dorsetshire, England, and she was a supporter of the missionary effort of St. Boniface in Germany, dispatching nuns to assist in the evangelization.

St. Conwall, 630 A.D. A disciple of St. Kentigern in Scotland also called Conval. He was a priest who preached and worked in Scotland.

St. Machan. Scottish saint educated in Ireland. Machan was ordained as a bishop in Rome. Details of his labors are not available.

September 29

Bl. Richard Rolle de Hampole, 1349 A.D. English mystic and hermit. Born at Thornton, Yorkshire, England, circa 1300, he was educated at Oxford and in Paris from 1320-1326, before entering into the life of a hermit on the estate of a friend, John Dalton of Pickering in 1326. After several years of intense contemplation, he took to wandering across England, finally settling down at Hampole where he assisted the spiritual development of the nuns in a nearby Cistercian community. He died there on September 29. Richard was very well known and his writings widely read during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. He was one of the first religious writers to use the vernacular. A cult developed to promote his cause after miracles were reported at his tomb, although the cause was never officially pursued. His works include letters, scriptural commentaries, and treatises on spiritual perfection. Perhaps his best known writing was De Incendio Amoris. He also wrote a poem, Pricke of Conscience.

September 30

St. Enghenedl, 7th century. Welsh saint venerated in a church in Anglesey, Wales.

St. Honorius of Canterbury, 653 A.D. Archbishop of Canterbury, England, a native of Rome, sent to the British Isles by Pope St. Gregory I the Great. Honorius was Benedictine who went to England at the request of St. Augustine of Canterbury. He succeeded to the see in 627. Honorius was consecrated by St. Paulinus, and he consecrated Sts. Felix and Ithamar, the first English born bishops. Honorius gave St. Paulinus refuge when he fled Caedwalla of Wales after the death of King Edwin.

St. Laurus, 7th century. Welsh abbot, also listed as Lery. He left Wales to go to Brittany, France, and founded an abbey on the river Doneff, now called Saint Lery.

St. Midan, 610 A.D. Saint of Anglesey, sometimes called Nidan. He was an evangelist of that region of Wales. Other details of his life no longer exist.


OCTOBER

October 1

Bl. Edward Campion, 1588 A.D. English martyr. He was born at Ludlow and studied at Oxford, England. A convert, he studied at Reims, France, and was ordained in 1587. Edward returned to England and a year later he was martyred at Canterbury. He was beatified in 1929.

Bl. Edward James, 1588 A.D. English martyr. He was born near Breaston, and studied at Oxford, England. Converting to the faith, Edward studied at Reims, France, and Rome, and was ordained in 1583. Returning as a missionary to England, he was arrested and martyred at Chichester. He was beatified in 1929.

St. Fidharleus, 762 A.D. Irish abbot who restored Rathin Abbey, Ireland.

Bl. John Robinson, 1588 A.D. Martyr of England. He was from Ferrensby, Yorkshire, and a widower who went to Reims for ordination. Ordained in 1585, John went back to England and was executed at Ipswich, receiving beatification in 1929.

Bl. Robert Widmerpool, 1588 A.D. English martyr. Originally from Nottingham, England, he studied at Oxford and worked as a tutor for the sons of the earl of Northumberland. He was arrested for giving aid to a Catholic priest. Robert was executed by being hanged, drawn, and quartered at Canterbury with Blessed Robert Wilcox, and they share the same feast day

Bl. Robert Wilcox, 1588 A.D. English martyr. Born at Chester, England, in 1558, he studied for the priesthood at Reims, France, and received ordination in 1585. Sent to England the following year, he worked in Kent. Robert was arrested in Marshsea. He was hanged, drawn, and quartered with Blessed Robert Widmerpool at Canterbury. With whom he shares a feast day

St. Ralph Crockett, 1588 A.D. English martyr. Born at Barton on the Hill, in Cheshire, he was edu­cated at Christ’s College, Cambridge, and Gloucester Hall, Oxford, and became a schoolmaster in Norfolk and Suffolk. Departing England, he went to Reims, France, and there studied for the priesthood, receiving ordination in 1586. Returning home to undertake the hazardous work of reconverting the island, he was arrested with Blessed Edward James and was imprisoned for two and a half years in London before being taken to Chichester. Ralph was martyred at Chichester by being hanged, drawn, and quartered. He was beatified in 1929.

St. Melorius. Prince of Cornwall, England, who was murdered as a child. Also listed as Mylor, Melar, and Melorus, he was the victim of an uncle’s ambitions. He was venerated in Amesbury, England, in Brittany, and in Cornwall. The tale has several versions, most dating to the Middle Ages.

October 2

St. Thomas of Hereford, 1282 A.D. Bishop of Hereford, also called Thomas Cantilupe. Born at Buckinghamshire, England, circa 1218, he studied at Oxford, Paris, and Orleans. Returning to England, he became chancellor of Oxford University in 1261, using his influence to aid the barons in their struggle against King Henry III (r. 1216-1272). In 1265, after the defeat of Henry's forces at the battle of Lewes, Thomas was named chancellor of England, although he was soon compelled to retire to Paris after the barons lost their grip on power. Returning to Oxford, he served once more as chancellor of the university in 1273. Two years later he was appointed bishop of Hereford, acquiring a wide reputation for sanctity and charity and serving as one of the most capable counselors of King Edward I (r. 1272-1307). He also was a stern opponent of simony and all forms of secular encroachment upon his Episcopal rights. His relationship with Thomas John Peckham, archbishop of Canterbury, deteriorated over matters of jurisdiction, culminating in Thomas' excommunication by the archbishop in 1282. He appealed to the papal court but died before any decision was reached by the pope. Despite the controversy, Thomas was revered in England and miracles were reported at his tomb; in 1320, he was canonized.