English Speaking Saints And Martyrs

English Saints and Martyrs

Sunday, April 25, 2010

ENGLISH SPEAKING SAINTS AND MARTYRS APRIL 25-MAY 1


Bl. William Marsden
1586 A.D.
Feastday: April 25
Martyr of England. A native of Lancashire, he studied at Oxford and then departed the island for Reims, France, where he was ordained in 1585 with Blessed Robert Anderson. They were sent to England but were forced to land on the Isle of Wight in a storm. They were arrested and then condemned and hanged on April 25 on Wight. Both were beatified in 1929, and share the feast.

St. Mella
Feastday: April 25
780 A.D.
Widow and abbess. She was the mother of St. Cannech and Tigernach, and lived in Connaught, Ireland. She became the abbess of Doire­Melle, Leitrim.

St. Riquier
Feastday: April 26
645 A.D.
Abbot and hermit, also called Richarius. Born at Celles, near Amiens, France, he became a priest after rescuing two Irish missionaries from a murderous band of local pagans. After studying in England, he was ordained and returned home, where he founded an abbey at Celles over which he presided as abbot. He later resigned from his office and spent his remaining days as a hermit on the site of Forest Montiers Monastery. Abbeville is the modern site of Riquier’s foundation.

St. Asicus
Feastday: April 27
490 A.D.
Abbot-Bishop of Ireland and disciple of St. Patrick, also called Ascicus and Tassach. Asicus was a coppersmith and was married when he first met St. Patrick. In time he was made the first abbot-bishop of Elphim Monastery in Roscommon, Ireland. Humble and not believing he was worthy of the office, Asicus went to an island in Donegal Bay, where he resigned his rank and became a hermit. After seven years the monks of Elphin found him and persuaded him to return to the monastery. He died at Raith Cungilor on the return journey.

St. Winewald
Feastday: April 27
731 A.D.
Winewald, Second abbot of Beverley monastery in England succeeding St. Berchtun. He was successful in his efforts to make Beverley a center for English cultural and spiritual growth.

St. Enoder
Feastday: April 27
6th century
Grandson of Welsh chieftain Brychan of Brecknock, also called Cnydr, Keneder, and Quidic. There is considerable dispute as to his identity, as he could be St. Enoder or Enodoc of Cornwall, England. Llangynidir of Powys wrote of him. Enoder was an abbot.

St. Cronan of Roscrea
Feastday: April 28
626 A.D.
Founder and hermit in Ireland. He was the son of Odran, born in Munster, or possibly Ely O’Carroll, Offaly, Ireland. Cronan founded fifty monasteries, the first at Puay and the most famous at Roscrea. He ended his life as a blind hermit.

St. Wilfrid the Younger
Feastday: April 29
744 A.D.
Benedictine abbot and bishop of York, England. A monk and disciple of St. John of Beverley, he studied at Whitby Abbey and received ordination. He became John's chaplain when John was named bishop of York, and received appointment as abbot of the cathedral community in the city. Soon after, he was appointed John's coadjutor and succeeded to the see atYork at his benefactor's passing in 721. He eventually retired to a monastery, most likely Ripon, where he died.

St. Senan
Feastday: April 29
7th century
Welsh hermit. Owing to the confusion of records and traditions of this time and region, it is difficult to determine precise details of his life, but he is known to have labored in the northern districts of Wales.

St. Dichu
Feastday: April 29
5th century
First convert of St. Patrick in Ulser, Ireland. He is listed as a swineherd in some lists and in others as a the son of an Ulster chieftain. Opposed to Patrick originally, Dichu converted and gave Patrick a church in Saul, the capital of Lecale in County Down.

St. Endellion
Feastday: April 29
6th century
Virgin recluse honored at St. Endellion, in Cornwall, England. She was the sister of St. Nectan of Hartland, and the daughter of Brychan of Brecknock.

St. Fiachan
Feastday: April 29
7th century
Disciple of St. Carthage the Younger, a native of Munster, Ireland. He was a monk in Lismore Abbey.

Bl. Francis Dickenson
Feastday: April 30
1590 A.D.
English martyr. He was born in Yorkshire, England, and was a convert to the Church. After being ordained at Reims, France, in 1589, he returned to England and was promptly arrested. Francis was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Rochester. He was beatified in 1929.

St. Cynwl
Feastday: April 30
6th century
A hermit, the brother of St. Deinoil, noted fir his austere life in southern Wales. Several churches in the region were dedicated to Cynwl.

St. Forannan
Feastday: April 30
932 A.D.
Irish bishop of Domhnach-Mor, Ireland, no longer listed as a diocese. With twelve companions he went to Belgium and founded an abbey at Waulsort, on the Meuse River, becoming abbot in 962. Forannan introduced the Benedictine rule to Waulsort. Forannan went to Belgium in response to a dream.

St. Gerard Miles
Feastday: April 30
1590 A.D.
Martyr of England with Blessed Francis Dickinson. He was born in Lancashire, England, and went to Douai and Reims where he was ordained in 1583. Returning from England, he was arrested when the ship that he and Francis were using wrecked at Kent. They were arrested and hanged, drawn, and quartered at Rochester in April. They were beatified in 1929.

St. Asaph
Feastday: May 1
600 A.D.
First bishop of Asaph in Wales,also called Asa. He is believed to have lived in a hemitage near Tenegel, near Holywell. He is also described in a life of St. Kentigern, or Mungo. While still young, Asaph served Kentigern. Asked to bring Kentigern a piece of wood for the fire, Asaph brought live coals in his apron, an event that alerted Kentigern to Asaph's sanctity. When Kentigern left the area in 573, Asaph was consecrated a bishop. Asaph's relatives, Deiniol, Tysilo, and others were honored as saints.

St. Brieuc
Feastday: May 1
510 A.D.
Bishop educated by St. Germanus, in Auxerre, France. He is believed to have been born in Dyfed or Cardiganshire, Wales, circa 420. Ordained in France, Brieuc returned to England as a missionary. Known also as Briocus, Briomaglus, or Brioc, he converted his parents and became known for his miracles. He also converted Conan, a local ruler of Brittany, France, and founded a monastery near the present site of the town of Saint-Brieuc in Brittany. He remained in Brittany, dying at the age of ninety. Brieuc is venerated in Cornwall, England, and is credited with stopping a plague.

St. Ceallach
Feastday: May 1
6th century
Disciple of St. Kiernan, a bishop, sometimes called Kellach or Celsus. He was a bishop of Killala, Ireland, but ended his life as a hermit. Some records lists him as a martyr.

Thursday, April 22, 2010

ENGLISH SPEAKING SAINTS AND MARTYRS APRIL 18-24

St. Cogitosus
Feastday: April 18
8th century
Monk of Kildare, Ireland, and the biographer of St. Brigid. This work is invaluable because of its details of St. Brigid in the era in which she lived.

St. Laserian
Feastday: April 18
639 A.D.
Bishop and papal legate, brother of St. Goban, also listed as Molaisse. Laserian was born in Ireland and was a monk on lona, Scotland. He went to Rome and was ordained by Pope St. Gregory I the Great. Returning to Ireland, Laserian supported Roman liturgical images, and he went back to Rome with a group to have Pope Honorius I settle the dispute. Laserian was made a bishop and papal legate to Ireland. In 637, he succeeded his brother, St. Goban, as abbot of Leighlin.

St. James Duckett, Blessed
Feastday: April 18
1602 A.D.
Martyr of England, hanged at Tybum. James was born in Gilfortriggs, Westmoreland, England. After being drawn to Catholicism, he refused to attend Protestant services and passed two terms in prison. He then took instructions and was baptized. James went to London, where he spent more time in prison and distributed Catholic materials. Arrested for his faith, he was imprisoned for nine years before his execution at Tyburn. He was beatified in 1929.

St. Alphege
Feastday: April 19
1012 A.D.
Archbishop and "the First Martyr of Canterbury." He was born in 953 and became a monk in the Deerhurst Monastery in Gloucester, England, asking after a few years to become a hermit. He received permission for this vocation and retired to a small hut near Somerset, England. In 984 Alphege assumed the role of abbot of the abbey of Bath, founded by St. Dunstan and by his own efforts. Many of his disciples from Somerset joined him at Bath. In that same year, Alphege succeeded Ethelwold as bishop of Winchester.
He served there for two decades, famed for his care of the poor and for his own austere life. King Aethelred the Unready used his abilities in 994, sending him to mediate with invading Danes. The Danish chieftain Anlaf converted to Christianity as a result of his meetings with Alphege, although he and the other chief, Swein, demanded tribute from the Anglo-Saxons of the region. Anlaf vowed never to lead his troops against Britain again. In 1005 Alphege became the successor to Aleric as the archbishop of Canterbury, receiving the pallium in Rome from Pope John XVIII. He returned to England in time to be captured by the Danes pillaging the southern regions.
The Danes besieged Canterbury and took Alphege captive. The ransom for his release was about three thousand pounds and went unpaid. Alphege refused to give the Danes that much, an act which infuriated them. He was hit with an ax and then beaten to death. Revered as a martyr, Alphege's remains were placed in St. Paul's Church in London. The body, moved to Canterbury in 1023, was discovered to be incorrupt in 1105. Relics of St. Alphege are also in Bath, Glastonbury, Ramsey, Reading, Durham, Yorkminster and in Westminster Abbey. His emblem is an ax, and he is depicted in his pontifical vestments or as a shepherd defending his flock.

St. Ursmar
Feastday: April 19
713 A.D.
Benedictine abbot-bishop, and missionary. A native of Ireland, he served as abbot-bishop of the abbey of Lobbes, on the Sambre, in Flanders, Belgium, from which he organized exceedingly successful missionary efforts in the region.

Bl. John Finch
Feastday: April 20
1584 A.D.
Martyr of England. He was a yeoman farmer of Eccleston, Lancashire, who returned to the Church. He harbored priests and acted as a clerk and catechist. John was arrested and tried with Blessed James Bell. They were executed at Lancaster. Both were beatified in 1929.

Bl. Robert Watkinson
Feastday: April 20
1579-1602
English martyr. Born at Hemingborough, Yorkshire, he left England and studied at Douai, France, and then Rome in preparation for his ordination in 1602 in Arras, France. Sent home to work for the reconversion of England, he was arrested almost immediately and executed at Tyburn. Robert was hanged, drawn, and quartered on April 20, with Blessed Francis Page. He was beatified in 1929.

Bl. Francis Page
Feastday: April 20
1602 A.D.
Jesuit martyr of England. Born in Antwerp, Belgium, Francis was a member of an English Protestant family of Harrow-on-the-Hill, in England. Reconciled to the Catholic faith, he was ordained in 1600 and sent from Douai, France, to England. He was arrested there two years later. While in prison, Francis entered the Society of Jesus, the Jesuits. He was martyred at Tyburn, England, and was beatified in 1929.

St. Beuno
Feastday: April 21
Beuno's legend has him a monk in Wales who founded his own community and performed numerous miracles, among them, restoring St. Winifred's head after she was beheaded. However, he does seem to have been an effective preacher who evangelized much of North Wales and founded a monastery at Clynnog Fawr (Carnavonshire).

St. Arwald
Feastday: April 22
686 A.D.
Martyrs, sons of Arwald, the prince of the Isle of Wight, just off the English coast. The martyrs are called Arwald because their proper names are not known. They were slain after Baptism by King Cadwall, who was a pagan.

St. George
Feastday: April 23
Patron of England, Constantinople & Catalonia
Pictures of St. George usually show him killing a dragon to rescue a beautiful lady. The dragon stands for wickedness. The lady stands for God's holy truth. St. George was a brave martyr who was victorious over the devil.

He was a soldier in the army of the Roman Emperor Diocletian, and he was one of the Emperor's favorite soldiers. Now Diocletian was a pagan and a bitter enemy to the Christians. He put to death every Christian he could find. George was a brave Christian, a real soldier of Christ. Without fear, he went to the Emperor and sternly scolded him for being so cruel. Then he gave up his position in the Roman army. For this he was tortured in many terrible ways and finally beheaded.

So boldly daring and so cheerful was St. George in declaring his Faith and in dying for it that Christians felt courage when they heard about it. Many songs and poems were written about this martyr. Soldiers, especially, have always been devoted to him.

We all have some "dragon" we have to conquer. It might be pride, or anger, or laziness, or greediness, or something else. Let us make sure we fight against these "dragons", with God's help. Then we can call ourselves real soldiers of Christ. .

St. Mellitus of Canterbury
Feastday: April 24
624
Archbishop of Canterbury from 619. In 601, he was sent from St. Andrew’s Monastery, Rome, to England by Pope St. Gregory I the Great. Mellitus spent three years as a missionary in Kent, England, aiding St. Augustine. He also became the first bishop of London and was responsible for converting the King of the East Saxons. The Saxons, however, exiled him in 616 over some conflict, but Mellitus returned to England and was named archbishop of Canterbury, in succession to St. Lawrence. Tradition states that he saved Canterbury from a disastrous fire with his prayers.

St. Egbert
Feastday: April 24
Egbert IS A 8th. Century An English monk of Lindisfarne, he was anxious to go on the mission to Germany. His destiny, however, was less heroic but quite important. Settling on Iona, he succeeded in persuading the monks to adopt the roman usage over the celebration of Easter - a task which took thirteen years of gentle persuasion.

St. Diarmaid
Feastday: April 24
851 A.D.
Irish bishop of Armagh known for his learning. He was named bishop in 834 but was driven from his see by a usurper, Forau. Diarmaid went to Connacht, where he ruled as primate. During his reign, Norsemen destroyed churches inArmagh in 841.

St. Dyfnan
Feastday: April 24
Founder at Anglesey, Wales. He was the son of the Welsh chieftain Brychan of Brecknock.

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

April 11-17

"The saints have always been the source and origin of renewal in the most difficult moments in the Church's history."
- Pope John Paul II

St. Mary Margaret d'Youville Feastday: April 11
Foundress of the Sisters of Charity, the Grey Nuns of Canada. She was born at Varennes, Quebec, and was baptized Marie Marguerite Dufrost de Ia Jemmerais. After being educated by the Ursulines, she was married to Francois d’Youville in 1722, becoming a widow eight years later. Mary Margaret worked to support herself and her children, aiding the Confraternity of the Holy Family as well. In 1737, she founded the Sisters of Charity, the Grey Nuns, with three companions. A formal declaration took place in 1745, and two years later she became directress of Montreal’s General Hospital, operated by her community. The Grey Nuns expanded to the United States, Africa, and South America. Mary Margaret died in Montreal on December 23. She was canonized by Pope John Paul II in 1990.

St. Maedhog
Feastday: April 11
An Irish abbot, also called Aedhan or Mogue. He ruled Clonmore Abbey, Ireland, and was associated with Sts. Oncho and Finan.

St. Wigbert
Feastday: April 12
690 A.D.
Missionary. An Anglo-Saxon, he went to Ireland and became a disciple of St. Egbert before journeying to Friesland, the Netherlands, where he spent time as a missionary. He died in Ireland.

St. Caradoc
Feastday: April 13
1124 A.D.
Welsh hermit and harpist. He served a local king in southern Wales before becoming a hermit at St. Cendydd Church in Gower, later taking up residence on Barry Island at St. Issels. Forced into exile by Henry I's invasion of the re­gion, Caradoc went to Haroldston, where he occupied the cell of St. Ismael.

Bl. Edward Catheriek Feastday: April 13
English martyr. He was born at Carlton, near Richmond, Yorkshire, England, and educated at Douai, France. He returned to England in 1635 as a missionary priest and worked there until his martyrdom at York. Edward was beatified in 1929.

St. Gunioc
Feastday: April 13
838 A.D.
Scottish bishop who is recorded in the Aberden Breviary.

Bl. John Lockwood Feastday: April 13
English martyr, sometimes called John Lascelles. He was born in Sowerby, Yorkshire, and went to Rome to study for the priesthood as a mature man. He was ordained in 1597 returned to England the following year. He was arrested and banished in 1610 but returned to work until his arrest in 1642. At the age of eighty-one, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at York with Blessed John Catherick. John was beatified in 1929.

St. Tassach
Feastday: April 14
495 A.D.
Bishop, also known as Asicus. One of the first disciples of St. Patrick, he was a gifted artisan, creating for St. Patrick croziers, patens, and chalices. He was later appointed the first bishop of Rahoip, Ireland, and gave Patrick the last rites.

St. Paternus
Feastday: April 15
The first 5th century saint. He followed his father's path by becoming a hermit in Wales. He founded the monastery at the great church of Paternus, and became a bishop of that region. He was known for his preaching, charity and mortifications. Scholars believe his story is an amalgam.

St. Ruadan
Feastday: April 15
584 A.D.
One of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland, an abbot founder. He was born in Leinster, Ireland, and was a disciple of St. Finian of Clonard. Ruadan was the founder of the monastery of Lothra, in Tipperary, which had 150 monks.

St. Mundus
Feastday: April 15
962 A.D.
Scottish abbot sometimes called Mund, Munde, or Mond. He founded abbeys in Argyle, Scotland.

St. Donan Feastday: April 16 or 17 ST. Donan a remarkable fact about the widespread work of the Celtic missionary saints from the fifth century onwards is that scarcely any cases of violent opposition or martyrdom are recorded until the Viking and Danish raids began at the end of the ninth century. The pagan Celts accepted the missionaries even when they did not accept their religion and pagan and Christian symbols are found side by side on the great pictish stones.

Donan (or Donnan) deserves a note in these pages not only because of the extent of his journeyings but because he and his fellow monks on the island of Eigg provide the most dreadful case of martyrdom in the history of the Celtic Church. He and fifty-two of his followers were butchered within the refectory of the monastery. The only other martyrdoms recorded seem to be those of Constantine of Kintyre and of Kessog.

The date of his birth is not known but he was contemporary with, or a little younger, than Columba. We presume that he was Irish and early in adult life crossed to Galloway. Thereafter we only know him through a chain of Kildonans up the west coast of Scotland, beginning with a Kildonan at Kirkmaiden and a Chapel Donan at Kirkcolm, and terminating at Kildonan on the island of Little Bernera in the Outer Hebrides.

The story of Donan's martyrdom was by no means unknown in mediaeval Scotland and some commemorations might be due to later interest and veneration. But the plotting of the place-names suggests a logical route of missionary progression northwards.

Only one incident is recorded as happening during these missionary years. He crossed to lona to meet Columba, and according to the story, asked that saint to act as his 'anamchara' or 'soul- friend', which took the place of the Roman Church's 'confessor'. CLICK LOCATION LINK FOR MORE INFO http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=422