English Speaking Saints And Martyrs

English Saints and Martyrs

Saturday, July 24, 2010

ENGLISH SAINTS AND MARTYRS JULY 25-JULY 31

July 25
St. Nissen . Abbot and an Irishman, he was converted by St. Patrick and later became abbot of Mountgarret monastery in Wexford.

July 26

Bl. William Ward, 1641 A.D. Martyr of England. Born in Westmorland, England, he went to Douai, France, in 1604, where he studied and received ordination in 1608. Upon returning home to England, William was forced to land in Scotland and was arrested and imprisoned for three years. He was released and went on to England, where he spent twenty of his thirty-three years as a missionary in prison. When Catholic priests were banished on April 7, 1641, William was arrested. On July 26, he was executed at Tyburn.

Bl. John Ingram, 1594 A.D. Martyr of Scotland. He was born in Stoke Edith, Herefordshire, in 1565, and became a convert at Oxford. After conversion, he went to Reims and Rome and was ordained in 1589. Sent to Scotland in 1592, John was arrested on the Tyneside and taken to the Tower of London, where he was tortured Martyred at Gateshead, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered.

July 28

St. Samson, 565 A.D. Welsh bishop and evangelizer. Born at Glamorgan, Wales, he became a disciple of St. Illtyd at the monastery of Lianwit (Llantwit) in southern Glamorgan and then lived as a monk (and later abbot) of a community on Caldey Island (Ynys Byr). He was joined there by his uncle, Umbrafel, and his father, Amon. After a trip to Ireland, Samson became a hermit with Amon whom he cured of a mortal illness. During a trip to Cornwall, he was consecrated a bishop and appointed an abbot. He then departed England and went to Brittany where he spent the rest of his life as a missionary, even though he had long searched for solitude. Samson founded monasteries, including one at Dol and another at Pental, in Normandy. He was one of the foremost (if not relatively unknown) evangelizers of his century and has long been venerated with enthusiasm in Wales and Brittany.

July 29

St. Kilian, 7th century. An Irish abbot who wrote the life of St. Brigid. He ruled a monastery on the island of Iniscaltra, Ireland.

July 30

St. Tatwine, 734 A.D. Archbishop of Canterbury from 731. Probably from Mercia, England, he became a monk at Bredon, and eventually was named archbishop of Canterbury in succession to Brithwald. Respected by St. Bede, he was the author of several works, including a grammar and riddles.

Bl. Thomas Abel, 1540 A.D. English martyr. A graduate of Oxford University, Thomas served as chaplain to Queen Catharine of Aragon, proving intensely loyal to her cause during the ordeal of the divorce proceedings against her by King Henry VIII of England (r. 1509-1547). Arrested by English authorities for denying the spiritual supremacy of the king, he was incarcerated in the Tower of London for six years, finally receiving execution at Smithfield. He was beatified in 1886.

Bl. Edward Powell, 1504 A.D. English martyr, a councilor to Queen Catherine of Aragon, wife of King Henry VIII. A Welshman, Edward was a canon of Salisbury, England, and a fellow of Odd, noted for treatises opposing Martin Luther. He served Queen Catherine of Aragon and opposed the spiritual supremacy of Henry VIII. For this he spent six years in prison before being hanged, drawn, and quartered at Smithfield, London. He was beatified in 1886.

St. Ermengytha, 680 A.D. Benedictine nun, a daughter or sister of St. Ermenberga. She lived in Minster, on Thanet Isle, England, at a monastery ruled by Ermenberga.

Bl. Everard Hanse, 1581 A.D. Martyr of England who announced “O happy day!” as he died. He was raised a Protestant in Northhamptonshire, England, studied at Cambridge, and was ordained a minister. In 1568, he converted to the Church and went to Reims, France, where he was ordained in 1581. Returning as a missionary, Everard was arrested and condemned. He was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on July 31. He was beatified in 1886.

Bl. Richard Featherstone, 1540 A.D. English martyr. Richard served as a chaplain to Queen Catherine of Aragon and tutor to the princess Mary I. In the crisis which attended the king’s efforts to secure divorce from his wife, Richard spoke openly in her defense and was arrested for treason and executed at Tyburn.

July 31

St. Neot, Hermit, and relative of King Alfred the Great. A monk of Glastonbury, England, he was ordained before he departed to become a hermit in Cornwall. Tradition states that King Alfred visited him for his counsel

Sunday, July 18, 2010

ENGLISH SAINTS AND MARTYRS JULY 18-JULY 24

July 18

St. Theneva, 7th century. Also called Thenova, the patron saint of Glasgow, Scotland, with her son St. Kentigern.

St. Minnborinus, 986 A.D. Benedictine abbot. He was born in Ireland and became abbot of St. Martin Monastery in Cologne, Germany, in 974. There he promoted monastic reform and scholarly pursuits.

St. Edburga of Bicester, 7th century. Nun at Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England, the daughter of Penda , the pagan king of Mercia. Her shrine is at Stanton Harcourt, Oxfordshire, but her relics, originally at Bicester, were taken to Flanders, Belgium.

July 19

St. John Plessington, 1697 A.D. One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. He was born at Dimples, Lancashire, England, and the son of a Royalist Catholic. Educated at Valladolid, Spain, and St. Omer’s in France. he was ordained in Segovia in 1662. John returned to England after ordination and served as a missionary in Cheshire. He became a tutor at Puddington Hall near Chester until his arrest and martyrdom by hanging at Barrowshill, Boughton. near Chester. Pope Paul VI canonized him in 1970.

July 20

St. Etheidwitha. Widowed queen of King Alfred the Great of England. She was an Anglo-Saxon princess, also called Ealsitha. Etheldwitha founded a convent at Winchester in the Benedictine rule and became the abbess there.

July 22


Sts. Philip Evans and John Lloyd- Martyrs . Philip Evans was born at Monmouth in 1645, was educated at Saint-Omer, and joined the Society of Jesus at the age of twenty. In 1675 he was ordained at Liege and sent to South Wales. He was soon well known for his zeal, but no active notice was taken by the authorities until the scare of Oates plot, when in the November of 1678 John Arnold, of Llanvihangel Court near Abergavenny, a justice of the peace and hunter of priests, offered a reward of £200 for his arrest. Father Evans refused to leave his flock, and early in December was caught at the house of Christopher Turberville at Sker in Glamorgan. He refused the oath and was confined alone in an underground dungeon in Cardiff Castle. Two or three weeks afterwards he was joined by Mr. John Lloyd, a secular priest, who had been taken at Penlline in Glamorgan. He was a Breconshire man, who had taken the missionary oath at Valladolid in 1649 and been sent to minister in his own country.

After five months the two prisoners were brought up for trial at the shire-hall in Cardiff, charged not with complicity in the plot but as priests who had come unlawfully into the realm. It had been difficult to collect witnesses against them, and they were condemned and sentenced by Mr. Justice Owen Wynne principally on the evidence of two poor women who were suborned to say that they had seen Father Evans celebrating Mass. On their return to prison they were better treated and allowed a good deal of liberty, so that when the under-sheriff came on July 21 to announce that their execution was fixed for the morrow, Father Evans was playing a game of tennis and would not return to his cell till he had finished it. Part of his few remaining hours of life he spent playing on the harp and talking to the numerous people who came to say farewell to himself and Mr. Lloyd when the news got around. The execution took place on Gallows Field (at the north-eastern end of what is now Richmond Road, Cardiff). St Philip died first, after having addressed the people in Welsh and English, and saying ‘Adieu, Mr. Lloyd, though for a little time, for we shall shortly meet again, to St John, who made only a very brief speech because, as he said, ‘I never was a good speaker in my life.

St. Dabius. Irish missionary to Scotland called Davius in some lists. He was part of the great monastic missionary effort in the British Isles, and then in Europe. Several churches there bear his name.

St. Movean. Abbot and companion of St. Patrick also called Biteus. Movean was abbot of Inis-Coosery, County Down, Ireland. He served as a missionary in Perthshire and died as a hermit.

July 23

Sts. Rasyphus and Ravennus, 5th century. Martyrs. They came from Britain, fleeing the islands upon the invasions by the Anglo Saxons. Settling in Gaul, they became hermits and were martyred, perhaps by Arian Goths who were advancing through the West. Their relics are enshrined in the cathedral of Bayeux.

July 24

St. Declan. St. Declan First bishop of Ardmore in Ireland July 24 was baptized by St. Colman, and preached the faith in that country a little before the arrival of St. Patrick, who confirmed the Episcopal see of Ardmore, in a synod at Cashel in 448. Many miracles are ascribed to St. Declan, and he has ever been much honored in the viscounty of Dessee, anciently Nandesi.

Sts. Wulfhade and Ruffinus, 7th century. Wulfhade and Ruffinus (d.c. seventh century). Martyrs of England. Little is known about them with any certainty, although according to tradition they were two princes of Mercia who were baptized by St. Chad and were swiftly executed by their pagan father. They were martyred at Stone, Staffordshire

St. John Boste, 1594 A.D. One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. He was born at Dufton, at Westmoreland, England, and studied at Oxford. Becoming a Catholic in 1576, he went to Reims and received ordination in 1581. John went back to England where he worked in the northern parts of the kingdom and became the object of a massive manhunt. He was betrayed, arrested, and taken to London. There he was crippled on the rack and returned to Dryburn near Durham. On July 24, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered. John was canonized by Pope Paul VI in 1970 as a martyr of Durham.

St. Lewina, 5th century. Martyred virgin of England, a Briton slain by invading Saxons. In 1058, her relics were translated from Seaford, in Sussex, England, to Berques in Flanders, Belgium.

St. Menefrida, 5th century. Patron saint of Tredresick, in Cornwall, England. She belonged to the family of Brychan of Brecknock.

Saturday, July 10, 2010

ENGLISH SAINTS AND MARTYRS JULY 11-JULY17

July 11

St. Turketil , 975 A.D. Abbot and brother of King Edred of England, he served as his chancellor until 948 when he abandoned the court life and entered a monastery. He soon became abbot of Croyland and successfully established a school which was attached to the community.

St. Oliver Plunkett, 1681 A.D. Oliver Plunkett was born in Loughcrew in County Meath, Ireland on November 1, 1625. In 1647, he went to study for the priesthood in the Irish College in Rome. On January 1, 1654, he was ordained a priest in the Propaganda College in Rome. Due to religious persecution in his native land, it was not possible for him to return to minister to his people. Oliver taught in Rome until 1669, when he was appointed Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of Ireland. Archbishop Plunkett soon established himself as a man of peace and, with religious fervor, set about visiting his people, establishing schools, ordaining priests, and confirming thousands.

The year 1673 brought a renewal of religious persecution, and bishops were banned by edict. Archbishop Plunkett went into hiding, suffering a great deal from cold and hunger. His many letters showed his determination not to abandon his people, but to remain a faithful shepherd. He thanked God "Who gave us the grace to suffer for the chair of Peter." The persecution eased a little and he was able to move more openly among his people. In 1679 he was arrested and falsely charged with treason. The government in power could not get him convicted at his trial in Dundalk. He was brought to London and was unable to defend himself because he was not given time to bring his own witnesses from Ireland. He was put on trial, and with the help of perjured witnesses, was sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn. With deep serenity of soul, he was prepared to die, calmly rebutting the charge of treason, refusing to save himself by giving false evidence against his brother bishops. Oliver Plunkett publicly forgave all those who were responsible for his death on July 1, 1681. On October 12, 1975, he was canonized a saint.

St. Drostan, 610 A.D. Irish born abbot, a disciple of St. Columba. Drostan was a member of the royal Cosgrach family of Ireland. He was named the first abbot of Deer in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and is considered an apostle to Scotland. He ended his days near Glenesk, Angus, and a well is associated with him at Aberdour.

July 12

St. Menulphus, 7th century. Bishop of Quimper in Brittany, France, originally an Irish pilgrim. Also called Menou, Menuiphus made a journey to Rome and died at Bourges on his return to Quimper.

Bl. David Gonson, 1541 A.D. Martyred English knight of St. John. He was the son of a British vice-admiral. David was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Southwark.

St. John Jones, 1598 A.D. Franciscan member of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. He was born in Clynog Fawr, Gwynedd, Wales, and left the island for Rome where he became a Franciscan. He was ordained and returned to England in 1592, where he used the alias Buckley to assist his work. Arrested by English authorities for caring for the prisoners of London, he was kept in confinement for two years. John was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Southwark, London. Pope Paul VI canonized him in 1970.

July 13

Bl. Thomas Tunstal, 1616 A.D. English martyr. Born in Whinfell, near Kendal, Westmoreland, he studied for the priesthood at Douai, France, and was ordained there in 1609. The next year he returned to England but was arrested almost immediately upon his arrival. Escaping, Thomas was recaptured and taken to Norwich where he spent six years in confinement until finally being hanged, drawn, and quartered. While in prison, he joined the Benedictine Order.

St. Dogfan, 5th century. Welsh martyr, descended from chieftain Brychan of Brecknock. He was slain by pagan invaders at Dyfed, Wales. A church there honors his memory.

July 14

Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha, 1680 A.D. Patron of the environment and ecology. Kateri was born near the town of Auriesville, New York, in the year 1656, the daughter of a Mohawk warrior. She was four years old when her mother died of smallpox. The disease also attacked Kateri and transfigured her face. She was adopted by her two aunts and an uncle. Kateri became converted as a teenager. She was baptized at the age of twenty and incurred the great hostility of her tribe. Although she had to suffer greatly for her Faith, she remained firm in it. Kateri went to the new Christian colony of Indians in Canada. Here she lived a life dedicated to prayer, penitential practices, and care for the sick and aged. Every morning, even in bitterest winter, she stood before the chapel door until it opened at four and remained there until after the last Mass. She was devoted to the Eucharist and to Jesus Crucified. She died on April 7, 1680 at the age of twenty-four. She is known as the "Lily of the Mohawks". Devotion to Kateri is responsible for establishing Native American ministries in Catholic Churches all over the United States and Canada. Kateri was declared venerable by the Catholic Church in 1943 and she was Beatified in 1980. Work is currently underway to have her Canonized by the Church. Hundreds of thousands have visited shrines to Kateri erected at both St. Francis Xavier and Caughnawaga and at her birth place at Auriesville, New York. Pilgrimages at these sites continue today. Bl. Kateri Teckakwitha is the first Native American to be declared a Blessed.

Bl. Richard Langhorne, 1679 A.D. English martyr. Born in Bedfordshire, he was educated at the Inner Temple and worked as a lawyer. He was arrested in 1667, released in 1679, and then arrested again as a conspirator in the so-called “Popish Plot.” He was hanged at Tybum on July 14. Richard was beatified in 1929.

July 15

St. Swithun "Swithin". Swithun, also spelled Swithin, was born in Wessex, England and was educated at the old monastery, Winchester, where he was ordained. He became chaplain to King Egbert of the West Saxons, who appointed him tutor of his son, Ethelwulf, and was one of the King's counselors. Swithun was named bishop of Winchester in 852 when Ethelwulf succeeded his father as king. Swithun built several churches and was known for his humility and his aid to the poor and needy. He died on July 2. A long-held superstition declares it will rain for forty days if it rains on his feast day of July 15, but the reason for and origin of this belief are unknown.

St. Donald. All that is recorded of this saint, whose name is so common in Scotland, is that he lived at Ogilvy in Forfarshire in the eighth century, that his wife bore him nine daughters, and that on her death they formed a sort of community who led the religious life under his direction. But if no more is known of him, he has nevertheless left his mark otherwise, for the often found natural features, wells, hills, and so on, which are known as the "Nine Maidens", are so called in memory of his daughters. They are said to have afterwards entered a monastery founded by St. Darlugdach and St. Brigid at Abernethy, and were commemorated on July 18. The popularity of the name in Scotland must be attributed, not to veneration for the saint, but to the ubiquity of the sons of Somerled of the Isles, clan Donald.

St. Edith of Polesworth. St. Edith of Polesworth, whose feast day is July 15, was the sister of King Athelstan of England. She married Viking king Sihtric at York in 925, and when he died the next year, she became a Benedictine nun at Polesworth, Warwickshire, where she was noted for her holiness and may have become Abbess. She may also have been the sister of King Edgar and aunt of St. Edith of Wilton; or possibly these were two different woman of Polesworth

St. Seduinus. English saint possibly identical to St. Swithin or Sithian.

St. David of Sweden, 1080 A.D. Benedictine bishop, born in England and sometimes called David of Muntorp. He went as a missionary to Sweden to aid Bishop Sigfrid of Vaxio, who had lost his three missionary nephews. Sigfrid sent David to Vastmanland, and there David founded a monastery at Munktorp or Monkentorp. He ruled that mon­astery as abbot until becoming the bishop of Vasteras

St. Plechelm, 775 A.D. A Benedictine companion to St. Wiro. Plecheim was from Northumbria, England, and was an ordained priest. He traveled with St. Wiro to establish a monastery at Odilienburg.

July 16

St. Tenenan, 7th century. Hermit and bishop. A native of Britain, he lived for many years as a recluse in Brittany, France, and later served as bishop of Le6n, Spain.

St. Helier, 6th century. Martyr on the island of Jersey, Britain. Also called Helerous, he was murdered by pagans he was evangelizing. He was born in Tongres, Belgium, and raised by a priest; later, he spent time with St. Marculf at Nanteuil.

July 17

St. Turninus, 9th century. Irish priest and missionary. He labored to help evangelize the region of the Netherlands with St. Foillan, especially in the area around Antwerp.

St. Cynllo, 5th century. Welsh saint, patron of churches named in his honor. No records of his life are extant.

St. Fredegand. Benedictine abbot, an Irishman and a companion of St. Foillan. He was abbot of Kerkeloder Abbey, near Antwerp, Belgium, also listed as Fregaut. He also aided St. Willibrord.

St. Kenelm, 821 A.D. Martyred king of Mercia, England. Traditions state that he was the son of King Kenulf, who succeeded to the throne at the age of seven. He was murdered by henchmen of his sister, Cynefrith. Another tradition states that his sister Quendreda bribed his tutor to slay him. He is buried at Winchcombe Abbey, in Gloucestershire. Miracles took place there. Kenelm is now belived to have died before his father. He is mentioned in the Canterbury Tales.

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Saturday, July 03, 2010

ENGLISH SAINTS AND MARTYRS JULY 3 -JULY10

July 4

Bl. William Andleby, 1597 A.D. Martyr of England. Born at Eton, near Beverley, England, he studied at St. Johns College, Cambridge, and was converted to Catholicism on the way to fight the Spanish. He went to Douai, France, and was ordained in 1577. Returning home, he worked in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire for two decades. Arrested and condemned, he was executed at York with Thomas Warcop and two companions. He was beatified in 1929.

Bl. Thomas Warcop, 1597 A.D. English martyr. A gentleman in Yorkshire, England, who sheltered Blessed William Andleby. He was arrested and condemned for giving this aid and hanged at York with three companions on July 4.

Bl. Edward Fulthrop, 1597 A.D. An English martyr at Yorkshire. He reconciled to the faith and was martyred at York. Edward was beatified in 1929.

St. Henry Abbot, Blessed, 1597 A.D. Martyr of England. A native of Howden, England, Henry became a convert to the Church and was duly arrested and hanged at York. Pope Pius XI beatified him 1929.

Bl. John Carey, 1594 A.D. Martyr of England, an Irish layman. He was the servant of Blessed Thomas Bosgrave and was put to death with Blesseds Thomas Bosgrave, John Cornelius, and Patrick Salmon at Dorchester in Oxfordshire. They were beatified in 1929.

Bl. John Cornelius, 1594 A.D. Martyred Jesuit of England. He was of Irish descent and was born in Bodmin. Educated at Oxford, he went to Reims and then Rome where he was ordained in 1583. John went to England the next year, where he used the alias Mohan, and where he became a Jesuit. He was discovered at Lady Arundel’s Castle in Dorset. In 1594, after working for ten years in Lanherne, he was executed at Dorchester, Oxfordshire, with Blesseds Thomas Bosgrave, John Carey, and Patrick Salmon. They were beatified in 1929.

St. Odo the Good, 959 A.D.
Archbishop of Canterbury, also known as Odo of Canterbury. Born to Danish parents in East Anglia, he joined a Benedictine monastery at Fleury-sur-Loire and then was appointed bishop of Ramsbury, in Wessex. In 937, Odo was present at the Battle of Brunabur where King Athelstan of Wessex defeated a force of Scots, Danes, and Northumbrians. In 942, Odo became archbishop of Canterbury, wielding both secular and spiritual authority with fairness and deep concern for the welfare of the people. He assisted in the formulation of the legislation of Kings Edmund and Edgar the Peaceful, created as a separate diocese the region of East Anglia, and gave his blessings to the monastic reforms of St. Dunstan at Glastonbury, thereby promoting the revival of monasticism in England. Known as “the Good” because of his famed holiness, he was also credited with miracles

Bl. Patrick Salmon, 1594 A.D. Martyr of England. He was a servant of Blessed Thomas Bosgrave and was martyred with him at Dorchester, England. They were charged with sheltering a priest.

July 5

St. Edana, Irish saint venerated in western Ireland, sometimes called Etaoin. She lived near the Boyle and Shannon Rivers and a well bears her name. She may be confused with St. Modwenna.

Sts. Fragan and Gwen, 5th century. The parents of Sts. Jacut, Guithem, and Winwaloe. Fragan and Gwen went to Brittany, France, to escape the pagan barbarians of England. Churches in Brittany were dedicated to each of them.

July 6

Bl. Thomas Alfield, 1585 A.D. English martyr. A native of Gloucester, he was educated at Eton and Cambridge. While raised as an Anglican, he eventually was converted to Catholicism and left England to study for the priesthood at Douai and Reims, France, receiving ordination in 1581. Returning to England, he was soon arrested while handing out copies of the polemic True and Modest Defence by Dr. Allen. Condemned, he was hanged at Tybum. Thomas was beatified in 1929.

St. Modwenna. The St. Modwenna, or Monenna, formally venerated at Burton-on-Trent and elsewhere, may have lived in the middle of the seventh century and been a recluse on an islet called Andresey in the Trent. But not only are other and conflicting things alleged of her, but her legend has been confused with that of the Irish saint Darerca, or Moninne, said to have been the first abbess of Killeavy, near Nerwy and to have died in 517; and she has perhaps been confused with others as well. Capgrave and others speak of St. Modwenna as having charge of St. Edith of Polesworth, which were it true would throw no useful light on either saint. The most valuable information we possess about St. Moninne seems to be the entry in the Felire of Oengus: "Moninne of the mountain of Cuilenn was a fair pillar; she gained a triumph, a hostage of purity, a kinswoman of great Mary", with the gloss.

July 7

St. Ercongotha, 660 A.D. Benedictine nun, the daughter of a king of Kent and St. Sexburga. Also called Ercongota, she was a nun in Faremoutiers-en-Brie, France, at least for a short time, and possibly died there at a young age.


St. Humphrey Lawrence, 1572-1591 A.D. Martyr of England. Born in Hampshire, he was a convert to Catholicism through the efforts of Jesuit missionaries. Humphrey openly called Queen Elizabeth I a heretic and she had him arrested immediately. He was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Winchester. Pope Pius XI beatified him in 1929.

Bl. Ralph Milner, 1591 A.D. English martyr. He was born at Stocksteads, Hampshire, and was a convert. He was arrested the day he received his first Communion. A husbandman by trade, Ralph was allowed a leave from prison and aided priests and Catholics. He was executed at Winchester on July by being hanged, drawn, and quartered for giving assistance to Blessed Roger Dickenson. He was beatified in 1929.

St. Maolruain. Abbot founder of Ireland. He opened Tallaght and compiled a mythology of the area.

Sts. Medran and Odran, 6th century. Two brothers who were disciples of St. Kieran of Saghir, in Ireland. One remained with St. Kieran and the other founded Muskerry Abbey.

St. Palladius, 432 A.D. An early Irish missionary, the first bishop of Ireland, and the immediate predecessor to St. Patrick. Perhaps originally of British or Roman descent, Palladius was possibly a deacon in Rome or, more likely, in Auxerre, France. According to the fifth century theologian Prosper of Aquitaine, Palladius convinced Pope Celestine I to send St. Germanus, bishop of Auxerre, to England with the aim of expunging the Pelagian heresy which was then rampant. It seems that Palladius was then consecrated a bishop by the pope who, in about 430, sent Palladius to preach among the Irish. He landed near Wicklow and founded at least three churches in Leinster, but his mission apparently made little impact upon the native population. Palladius departed Ireland and sailed for Scotland, where he preached among the Picts. He died at Fordun, near Aberdeen, a short time after arriving, although there is an unreliable Scottish tradition that he lived among the Picts for more than twenty years.

July 8

St. Kilian. An Irish monk, St. Kilian was consecrated Bishop, went to Rome with eleven companions in 686, and received permission from Pope Conon to evangelize Franconia (Baden and Bavaria). He was successful, with two followers - Colman, a priest, and Totnan, a deacon - in his missionary endeavors until he converted Gosbert, Duke of Wurzburg, who had married Geilana, his brother's widow. According to legend, while Gosbert was away on a military expedition, Geilana is reputed to have had the three missionaries beheaded when she found that Gosbert was going to leave her after Kilian had told him the marriage was forbidden by the Church.

St. Withburga, 743 A.D. Withburga (d.c. 743). Virgin and Benedictine nun. The youngest daughter of King Anna of East Anglia, England (d. 653). Following the death of her father in battle, she moved to Dereham where she established a nunnery and a church. She died with the church unfinished, on March 17. Her remains were later stolen by monks who enshrined her in Ely. A fresh spring, called Withburga's Well, sprang up at her grave in Dereham.


St. Grimbald, 901 A.D. Benedictine abbot also called Grimwald, invited to England by King Alfred in 885. Grimbald arrived in England and declined the see of Canterbury, preferring to remain a monk. He became the abbot of New Minster Abbey at Winchester appointed by King Edward the Elder. Grimbald is credited with restoring learning to England.

July 9

St. Everild, 7th century. Benedictine abbess and disciple of St. Wilfrid of York, England, sometimes called Averil. She was a noblewoman of Wessex who received the veil from St. Wilfrid. He also gave her a place called “the Bishop’s Farm”, where she became abbess of a large community. Her companions were Sts. Bega and Wulfreda.

Bl. Adrian Fortescue, 1539 A.D. Martyr who opposed the divorce of King Henry VIII of England from Catherine. A cousin of Anne Boleyn, Adrian was born in Punsborne, England, and was married twice. When his first wife Anne Stonor died in 1499, Adrian raised their two daughters. Twelve years later he married Anne Rede, who gave him three sons. A Knight of the Bath and a justice of the peace for Oxford, Adrian was a Dominican tertiary. Although related to Anne Boleyn, he opposed her marriage to the king and was arrested in 1534 for a short time. In 1539, when he refused to take the Oath of Supremacy supporting Henry VIII’s separation for Rome, Adrian was placed in the Tower of London. Permitted no trial and condemned by Parliament, Adrian was beheaded along with Thomas Dinglay on July 8 or 9.

July 10

St. Etto, 670 A.D. Irish missionary bishop in Belgium, also called Hitto. He was at St. Peter Abbey in Fescau .