English Speaking Saints And Martyrs

English Saints and Martyrs

Monday, January 23, 2006

English Catholic Martyrs Jan 21-24

Bl. Thomas Reynolds
Feastday: January 21
1642
English martyr. Born Thomas Green at Oxford, he left England and studied at Reims, France, and at Valladolid and Seville in Spain. Ordained in 1592, he went to England but was exiled in 1606. Thomas returned and labored for the faith until his arrest in 1628. He spent fourteen years in prison until he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn, with Blessed Alban Bartholomew Roe. Thomas was eighty at the time


St. Alban Bartholomew Roe
Feastday: January 21
1642
Missionary and martyr, one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. Alban is believed to have been born in Bury St. Edmund's, England, about 1580. He converted to Catholicism and went to the English College at Douai, where he was dismissed for an infraction of discipline. In 1612 he became an ordained Benedictine at Dieulouard, France. From there he was sent to England. In 1615 he was arrested and banished. In 1618 he returned to England and was imprisoned again. This imprisonment lasted until 1623, when the Spanish ambassador obtained his release. In 1625, once again having returned to England to care for Catholics, Alban was arrested for the last time. For seventeen years he remained in prison and was then tried and condemned. Alban was sentenced with Thomas Reynolds, another English martyr. They were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on January 21, 1642.

Bl. Edward Stransham
Feastday: January 21
1586
English martyr born and educated at Oxford, England. Studying at Douai and Reims, France, Edward was ordained in 1580 and was sent back to England in 1581. He worked in London and Oxford until his arrest. Condemned, Edward was martyred at Tyburn. He was beatified in 1929.


Bl. William Patenson
Feastday: January 22
1592
English martyr. Born at Durham, he departed his homeland and studied at Reims before receiving ordination there in 1587. The following year he sailed home and worked to promote the Catholic cause in the dangerous atmosphere of Elizabethan England. Arrested in 1591, he was tried and condemned for being a priest and was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. During his imprisonment, he converted six other prisoners to the Catholic faith. Beatified in 1929.


Bl. William Ireland
Feastday: January 24
1679
Jesuit martyr of England. He was born in Lincolnshire and studied at St. Omer, France, where he joined the Jesuits in 1655. He was professed in 1673 and was a confessor to nuns until he was sent to England, where he became known as William Ironmonger or Iremonger. William worked for the English mission until his arrest at the London Jesuit house and his subsequent execution at Tyburn for supposed complicity in the Popish Plot. He was beatified in 1929.

Bl. John Grove
Feastday: January 24
1697
English martyr, the servant of Blessed William Ireland. He served several Jesuits at a London house until his arrest. John was martyred at Tyburn with Blessed William Ireland for alleged involvement in the Titus Oates Plot. He was beatified in 1929.

Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Ven. Edward Waterson-martyred at Newcastle-on-Tyne, 7 January

Ven. Edward Waterson
Born at London; martyred at Newcastle-on-Tyne, 7 January 1594 (1593 old style).

A romantic episode marks this martyr's early career, for as a young man he travelled to Turkey with some English merchants, and attracted the attention of a wealthy Turk, who offered him his daughter in marriage if he would embrace Moslemism.
Rejecting the offer with horror, Edward Waterson returned westward through Italy and, coming to Rome, was there reconciled to the Catholic Church by Richard Smith, afterwards Bishop of Chalcedon.

The Pilgrim-book of the English College records his stay there, 29 November-11 December, 1588. He then went to Reims to study for the priesthood, arriving there 24 January, 1589.

He received the tonsure and minor orders on 18 August, 1590, subdiaconate on 21 September, 1591, diaconate on 24 February, 1592, and the priesthood 11 March following. On 24 June he returned to England, with such zeal for the missions that he declared to his companions that if he might have the Kingdom of France to stay there till the next midsummer he would rather choose to go to England.
Though he was not learned, his humility, sprit of penance, and other virtues caused him to be reagarded as a patern.

Captured at midsummer, 1593, he was cruelly treated in prison till his execution. Incidents occurred at the martyrdom of a miraculous nature. The horses were unable to drag the hurdle to the scaffold and the ladder was mysteriously agitated by invisible means, till the martyr signed it with the cross.

Monday, January 09, 2006

English Martyrs

Bl. Thomas Plumtree
Feastday: January 4
1570

English martyr. Born in Lincoinshire, he studied at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and was rector of Stubton. A dedicated Catholic, he took part in the uprising launched by northern Catholics, the Rising of the North against Queen Elizabeth I (r. 1558-1603), but was captured as the revolt failed completely. He was offered his freedom if he abjured the faith and he refused. He was hanged in Durham Castle.