English Speaking Saints And Martyrs

English Saints and Martyrs

Sunday, February 12, 2006

Bl. John Nutter and John Munden

Bl. John Nutter & John Munden
Feastday: February 12
1584
English martyrs. John Nutter was from Lancaster and was ordained at Reims in 1581 . Munden, a native of Dorset, was ordained at Reims in 1582. They were martyred at Tyburn with three priest companions. Both were beatified in 1929.

Wednesday, February 08, 2006

THEY PROVED THEIR FAITH

Bl. William Richardson
Feastday: February 7
1603
Martyr of England. Born in Sheffield, he studied for the priesthood at Valladolid and Seville, Spain, receiving ordination in 1594. William was sent back to England, where he used the name Anderson. He was soon arrested and executed at Tyburn by being hanged, drawn, and quartered. He was the last martyr in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (r. 1558-1603).



Bl. Thomas Hemerford
Feastday: February 12
1584
English martyr. A native of Dorsetshire, he was educated at Oxford and then studied for the priesthood at English College, Rome. He was ordained in Rome in 1583, and returned to England, where he was swifily arrested. Condemned for being a priest, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn with four companions. He was beatified in 1929.


St. James Feun, Blessed
Feastday: February 12
1584
Martyr in England. Born in Somerset, he studied at Oxford and became a fellow until he refused to take the Oath of Supremacy and was removed. James married and became a school­master in Somerset. After the passing of his wife, he went to Reims where he studied for the priesthood and received ordination in 1580. Returning to England, he worked in Somerset until arrested. He was then moved to London and named a conispirator of a bogus assassination plot. He was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on February 12. Pope Pius XI canonized him in 1929.

THESE DIED THAT WE MAY LIVE

Bl. Thomas Reynolds
Feastday: January 21
1642
English martyr. Born Thomas Green at Oxford, he left England and studied at Reims, France, and at Valladolid and Seville in Spain. Ordained in 1592, he went to England but was exiled in 1606. Thomas returned and labored for the faith until his arrest in 1628. He spent fourteen years in prison until he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn, with Blessed Alban Bartholomew Roe. Thomas was eighty at the time


St. Alban Bartholomew Roe
Feastday: January 21
1642
Missionary and martyr, one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales. Alban is believed to have been born in Bury St. Edmund's, England, about 1580. He converted to Catholicism and went to the English College at Douai, where he was dismissed for an infraction of discipline. In 1612 he became an ordained Benedictine at Dieulouard, France. From there he was sent to England. In 1615 he was arrested and banished. In 1618 he returned to England and was imprisoned again. This imprisonment lasted until 1623, when the Spanish ambassador obtained his release. In 1625, once again having returned to England to care for Catholics, Alban was arrested for the last time. For seventeen years he remained in prison and was then tried and condemned. Alban was sentenced with Thomas Reynolds, another English martyr. They were hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on January 21, 1642.

Bl. Edward Stransham
Feastday: January 21
1586
English martyr born and educated at Oxford, England. Studying at Douai and Reims, France, Edward was ordained in 1580 and was sent back to England in 1581. He worked in London and Oxford until his arrest. Condemned, Edward was martyred at Tyburn. He was beatified in 1929.


Bl. William Patenson
Feastday: January 22
1592
English martyr. Born at Durham, he departed his homeland and studied at Reims before receiving ordination there in 1587. The following year he sailed home and worked to promote the Catholic cause in the dangerous atmosphere of Elizabethan England. Arrested in 1591, he was tried and condemned for being a priest and was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn. During his imprisonment, he converted six other prisoners to the Catholic faith. Beatified in 1929.


Bl. William Ireland
Feastday: January 24
1679
Jesuit martyr of England. He was born in Lincolnshire and studied at St. Omer, France, where he joined the Jesuits in 1655. He was professed in 1673 and was a confessor to nuns until he was sent to England, where he became known as William Ironmonger or Iremonger. William worked for the English mission until his arrest at the London Jesuit house and his subsequent execution at Tyburn for supposed complicity in the Popish Plot. He was beatified in 1929.

Bl. John Grove
Feastday: January 24
1697
English martyr, the servant of Blessed William Ireland. He served several Jesuits at a London house until his arrest. John was martyred at Tyburn with Blessed William Ireland for alleged involvement in the Titus Oates Plot. He was beatified in 1929.

THREE ENGLISH MARTYRS

Bl. William Richardson
Feastday: February 7
1603
Martyr of England. Born in Sheffield, he studied for the priesthood at Valladolid and Seville, Spain, receiving ordination in 1594. William was sent back to England, where he used the name Anderson. He was soon arrested and executed at Tyburn by being hanged, drawn, and quartered. He was the last martyr in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (r. 1558-1603).



Bl. Thomas Hemerford
Feastday: February 12
1584
English martyr. A native of Dorsetshire, he was educated at Oxford and then studied for the priesthood at English College, Rome. He was ordained in Rome in 1583, and returned to England, where he was swifily arrested. Condemned for being a priest, he was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn with four companions. He was beatified in 1929.


St. James Feun, Blessed
Feastday: February 12
1584
Martyr in England. Born in Somerset, he studied at Oxford and became a fellow until he refused to take the Oath of Supremacy and was removed. James married and became a school­master in Somerset. After the passing of his wife, he went to Reims where he studied for the priesthood and received ordination in 1580. Returning to England, he worked in Somerset until arrested. He was then moved to London and named a conispirator of a bogus assassination plot. He was hanged, drawn, and quartered at Tyburn on February 12. Pope Pius XI canonized him in 1929.